Monthly Archives: April 2009

Was Manhattan traded for nutmeg?


It’s hard to believe that anyone would trade the thriving island of Manhattan for a spice, but history is full of surprises. Find out why — and how — the Dutch traded Manhattan for nutmeg in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com. … Continue reading

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Were ancient Egyptians the first feminists?


When Herodotus explored Egypt, he was startled by the contradictory gender roles — women were doing tasks the Greeks restricted to males. Does this mean the Egyptians were the first feminists? Learn more in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

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How Joan D’Arc Worked


Joan of Arc was a startling, larger-than-life figure, and she had a very strange trial. Learn why the Joan of Arc trial is so contentious — along with much more — in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

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Charlemagne’s Coronation


On Christmas Day in 800 AD, Charlemagne became the emperor of Rome in a coronation headed by none other than Pope Leo III. Learn more about the growth of the Holy Roman Empire in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

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How the Marshall Plan Worked


During a Harvard commencement speech, Secretary of State George Marshall outlined a plan to assist Europe after World War II. Listen in and learn how this 12 minute speech changed the future of Europe in this HowStuffWorks.com podcast.

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How Archimedes’ Death Ray Worked


Archimedes’ death ray is one of history’s most fabled legendary weapons — but what was it? Was it even real? Listen in as Candace and Jane sift through the legends and find the facts behind the ancient death ray in … Continue reading

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How did a shipwreck double the size of the US?


Originally, Spanish silver was meant to stabilize the Louisiana territory — but the ship carrying the necessary funds sank in the Gulf of Mexico. Find out more about the El Cazador shipwreck in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.

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